Integrated Risk Management Strategy

Create a Sustainable Integrated Risk Management Strategy

At a fundamental level, understanding risk is essential for running a business, since optimal business execution ultimately involves decisions that maximize rewards while minimizing the impacts of negative events. Understanding risk enables organizations to best allocate their resources (time, money, etc.) to reduce unacceptable risk, diminish unpredictability and achieve their business objectives. The uncertainty and rapid shifts facing organizations today has forced many organizations to rethink how they approach risk management. Compliance as an end goal has been supplanted by understanding the nuances of the business strategy and applying approaches to anticipate and avoid risks – or at a minimum, go in a direction with ‘eyes wide open’ to possible obstacles.


Certain tenets should guide an organization’s strategy for risk management. These guiding principles should be the foundation for the overall risk management strategy and be part of the fabric of the governance program. An integrated risk management strategy is not a one-time effort; it often requires a cultural shift in how an organization conducts business. Organization-wide commitment to a paradigm of good governance is critical to the success of risk management program. Without such a commitment, the program will be undermined and likely to fail.


Establish, adapt, and mature your integrated risk management program.


Principles to Follow for a Successful Integrated Risk Management Strategy


In addition to committing to a strong governance paradigm, the following principles must be ingrained into an organization’s integrated risk management strategy.


Establish, adapt, and mature your integrated risk management program.


Ownership. Organizations need to hold individuals responsible for fulfilling the roles for which they have been employed. The management of risk and compliance activities is everyone’s responsibility. This includes not only establishing executive roles but also clearly defining and enforcing responsibilities across all functions. In terms of integrated risk management, the layers of the organization represent the need for a strong vertical alignment – stressing ownership from the strategic level (management) to the business operations. Management functions are responsible for the ownership of risks and control procedures within their functions. Risk management and compliance oversight functions (such as enterprise risk, operational risk, security and corporate compliance) are responsible for the risk management framework, training and organizing risk assessments. Ultimately, business risk is owned by the business and front-line employees must understand their role in the grand scheme of the organization’s risk management strategy. linked to actual control procedure(s). The point is to be able to test one control to demonstrate compliance with all related obligations, saving time and freeing up compliance resources for other, more critical activities.


Establish, adapt, and mature your integrated risk management program.


Collaboration. Organizations need to reinforce collaboration across the enterprise on matters of risk and compliance management without regard to organizational boundaries. Collaboration introduces diversity in problemsolving through information sharing, analytics and tracking the right metrics to make the right decisions at the right time.


Establish, adapt, and mature your integrated risk management program.


Efficiency. Automated processes should be designed to drive efficiencies by taking spreadsheets, email, file sharing and manual processes ou t of the equation and by employing workflows to automate processes. Automation should ensure that the right people are engaged to contribute information and make decisions, at the right time, with the right information, based on business requirements and best practices.


Establish, adapt, and mature your integrated risk management program.


Business Context. An integrated risk management strategy should promote the importance of having clear understanding of the entire situation as informed business decisions can be made only by considering problems within their complete context. Business context means understanding interrelationships of risk to elements such as organizational hierarchy, stakeholders, business

objectives, products and services, business processes, assets, risks, control procedures, policies and procedures, authoritative requirements, and outstanding issues.


Establish, adapt, and mature your integrated risk management program.


Positive Assurance. At the end of the day, good business risk management should derive demonstrable assurance to the executives, shareholders, employees and applicable regulatory bodies. Risk and compliance efforts should focus on “what keeps people awake at night” as well as the many threats that could hinder the organization from achieving its objectives, providing clear evidence of the effectiveness of management’s oversight of risk and compliance objectives.


Establish, adapt, and mature your integrated risk management program.


Sustainability. Integrated risk management requires a persistent commitment to sustain the effort and achieve the strategic benefits. This must be factored in when designing a program. For instance, while the effort to comply with an individual regulation may be at an acceptable level right now, the processes impacted by that regulation have a tendency to evolve and can quickly grow outside their original boundaries or intent. Integrated risk management must acknowledge this change and be considered a long-term venture.


Establish, adapt, and mature your integrated risk management program.


Consistency. One can think of integrated risk management as a big playbook the organization uses to manage risk and compliance issues. The program involves many different processes—from overarching enterprise processes to daily operational processes. The architecture should bring order to this large effort and get employees on the same page with a common framework and strategy.


Establish, adapt, and mature your integrated risk management program.


Proficiency. Integrated risk management should invoke the concepts of continuous improvement and elimination of redundant efforts. Adjustments of processes to meet multiple goals can result in significant ef ficiency gains—generally more than initially estimated. In addition, the implementation and evolution of integrated risk management should strive to simplify complex processes. This means revising complex internal workflows in favor of streamlined and agile processes while retaining appropriate stakeholder governance.


Establish, adapt, and mature your integrated risk management program.


Agility. Given most organizations are in a constant state of motion, the risk management program must enable agile processes to react, respond to and address changes to the business. Regulatory changes, new business opportunities, technology shifts, reorganized business processes and other factors will constantly barrage an organization, and the risk and compliance implications must be managed in a manner that permits the business to consume, adjust to and manage these changes.


Establish, adapt, and mature your integrated risk management program.


Transparency. The concept of transparency should permeate the integrated risk management program. Transparency means delivering the right information to the right stakeholders within timeframes necessary for the purposes of enabling effective governance, informing business analysis and providing diverse organizations with information that can be leveraged. This transparency extends to both internal and external stakeholders and includes overall visibility into the structure of the program and the activities documented and managed within the program (such as the status of strategies and objectives, business entities, business processes, risks, controls and compliance with internal and external obligations). It is through the transparency of the risk management program that positive assurance of its effectiveness is demonstrated. 


Establish, adapt, and mature your integrated risk management program.


Balanced Effort and Reward. 


Finally, integrated risk management should be an effort to achieve long-term balance between the rewards of embarking on the journey and the costs associated with the journey. Organizations need to be smart and calculated in how and to what extent business risk management activities are implemented. Organizations should be thoughtful about the cost vs. benefit of each incremental step in the execution of an integrated risk management strategy. A keen eye should be focused on the scope and context of the organization’s desired governance end-state when preparing the journey to that state. This will help keep your organization from making missteps and pursuing activities that will ultimately slow its progress to the desired end-state.


Integrated Risk Management should add strategic value to the organization—enabling the business to focus on strategic objectives and optimize performance, not just simply meet compliance requirements. Ultimately, risk management is about making decisions— decisions to manage, accept, transfer or avoid risk. The principles outlined here should guide your efforts towards a sustainable program that evolves and adapts with the organization.


Establish, adapt, and mature your integrated risk management program.

Establish your integrated risk management program

Archer provides a governance, risk and compliance (GRC) solution that helps organizations reduce their organizational risk while achieving significant value in terms of GRC operational efficiencies.

With Archer you can unify your risk and compliance activities on a single platform to drive and support a truly integrated risk management program. Archer can help establish accountability, encourage collaboration, improve visibility and analytics, and bring efficiency to your risk program across your organization.